Friday, May 25, 2012

An Unschooling Friday

This week, I have shared snapshots of our unschooling life and how we live and learn each day.  I hope to run this series again in a few months to show how our daily unschooling rhythms change with the seasons and with our children's expanding interests and knowledge.


In the dizzying pace of modern childhood, unschooling helps us to live more slowly, more simply, centering our time around family, community, and the natural world.  In a way, I suppose, unschooling is a lot like the summer vacations I recall as a child.  With a few weeks off from school each summer, and not enrolled in camps or classes, I spent magical days exploring with my mom, visiting with family and friends, roaming through woods and water, and captivated by my own imagination.  Unschooling is really like a never-ending summer vacation, fueled by our children's powerful creativity, ceaseless energy, and drive to learn and do.



This morning at the lake unfolded slowly and simply, with early morning fishing and rolling in the grass.  It was also low-tide at the nearby ocean beach, so we piled in the car to take advantage of the vast expanses of sandbars and sea creatures left behind by the retreating waves.



One of the great benefits of homeschooling for our family is the flexibility it allows for us to spend time with Daddy whenever he is able to manage some time off from his work.  He joined us on our beach trip, enthusiastically searching for crabs and snails and other sand critters.


Later during naptime, my five-year-old painted the shells she collected.


And once the little ones were in bed, she and Daddy went for an evening kayak ride. Slow and simple.

2 comments:

  1. It has been fun to follow your week in unschooling!

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  2. Hello Kerry,
    This site is awesome. I don't know if you remember me. I am Paula Griffin's sister. Saw you a few times when you were still a child. This is really an awesome way to teach. I homeschooled my own daughter for her last two years of high-school. Kudos to your for this.

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